Union rights and solidarity

 

Well, not exactly. Two union members recently came to members of the Local 800 Executive Board, asking for help.

Four members of Local 800 joined 5000 delegates from across the United States and Canada at AFSCME's 43rd International Convention, held in Boston in mid-July.

“I was one of those members who never thought I’d need the Union’s help.”

#1 My supervisor told us that they cannot give us a raise because of the union.
The fact is that it is within the Employer's sole discretion to give merit increases, and they can even give raises that bring employees above the maximum pay for their job classification. If your supervisor says otherwise, a union representative will be happy to meet with the two of you and get the matter cleared up.

If you are called into a meeting with management, you have the right to request union representation, should you believe discipline might result. You must make this request. Management is not obligated to tell you about your Weingarten Rights. You can make the request before or during the meeting, saying something that conveys the following message:

LAS VEGAS — More than 160 AFSCME members gathered in Las Vegas last week to lift up the voice of public service workers and move our union forward.  

At the AFSCME Volunteer Member Organizer Rise Up conference, VMOs from around the country attended skill-building training sessions and visited Nevada state employees to share the vision of improving the quality of public services and the lives of those who provide those services. 

A federal court has ruled in favor of working families and against wealthy special interests in Danielson v. AFSCME Council 28, a case out of Washington state.  

LOS ANGELES — As fires burned in Northern and Southern California and the death toll continued to rise; as smoke engulfed nearby cities, prompting health warnings to stay indoors; and as survivors relocated to makeshift camps and hoped for the best, the best often

Pamela Knight, a child protective investigator with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Service (DCFS), was sent to check on the welfare of a child last fall. When she arrived at the child’s residence, the father viciously attacked her. She died months later as a result of the injuries she sustained during the attack.

This summer, I joined thousands of union members at a rally in Philadelphia to speak out against the Trump administration’s family separation policy. I was there to represent our union’s vision and values. We reject an immigration policy based on fear and cruelty. We embrace an immigration policy based on our common humanity, one that treats everyone with decency and dignity.

The best spokespeople for anyone running for elected office are everyday Americans spreading the word to their neighbors, co-workers, friends and relatives. That’s why public service workers who are AFSCME members came out this year across the nation to help elect candidates who support working families.

And we won big.

We won at every level of government and in almost every state. AFSCME members made our voices heard, helping our partners in For Our Future knock on 7.5 million doors and hold 925,000 conversations in targeted states.