Union rights and solidarity

 

When called into a meeting with management, you have the legal right to request representation if you believe the discussion could lead to discipline.

#1 My supervisor told us that they cannot give us a raise because of the union.
The fact is that it is within the Employer's sole discretion to give merit increases, and they can even give raises that bring employees above the maximum pay for their job classification. If your supervisor says otherwise, a union representative will be happy to meet with the two of you and get the matter cleared up.

As an AFSCME member you can get discounts on entertainment, health plans, auto services, home loans ... and more.  See here for an overview.

ENTERTAINMENT, RENTALS, AND FLOWERS

Well, not exactly. Two union members  came to members of the Local 800 Executive Board, asking for help, within a month of each other. In one case, the request was probably too late – though we could have been of help earlier. In the other case, the member ended up receiving a tidy packet of owed back pay!

“I was one of those members who never thought I’d need the Union’s help.”

These are the words of Taeko Sakumoto, an employee of Jewish Family Service. Then, after 17 years employment, she was terminated from her position as a Residential Counselor at a JFS Domestic Violence Shelter.

If you are called into a meeting with management, you have the right to request union representation, should you believe discipline might result. You must make this request. Management is not obligated to tell you about your Weingarten Rights. You can make the request before or during the meeting, saying something that conveys the following message:

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) emerges in the United States, many AFSCME members are and will continue to be on the front lines caring for and transporting those afflicted with the virus. Workers in emergency services, health care, child care, educational institutions and many others may come in contact with people who’ve contracted the coronavirus, putting themselves at risk.

On the eve of Saturday’s Nevada Democratic primary caucuses, AFSCME members and retirees gathered at a Las Vegas restaurant to hear one last time from presidential candidates on the issues that matter most to working families.

AFSCME members sat down with congressional lawmakers last week to share stories about how the Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act would improve communities and empower workers.